Assessment of tolerance to the effects of methamphetamine on daytime and nighttime activity evaluated with actigraphy in rhesus monkeys

Assessment of tolerance to the effects of methamphetamine on daytime and nighttime activity evaluated with actigraphy in rhesus monkeys

Author Berro, Lais F. Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Andersen, Monica L. Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Howell, Leonard L. Google Scholar
Abstract Methamphetamine is one of the most largely consumed illicit drugs, and its use is associated with abuse liability and several adverse health effects, such as sleep impairment. Importantly, sleep quality can influence addiction treatment outcomes. Evidence suggests that tolerance can develop to the sleep-disrupting effects of stimulant drugs. The aim of the present study was to investigate the development of tolerance to the actigraphy-based sleep-disrupting and stimulant effects of methamphetamine self-administration in rhesus monkeys. Methamphetamine (0.03 mg/kg/inf, i.v.) self-administration was carried out following three different protocols: 14 consecutive days of self-administration, 5 days/week for 3 weeks, with a 2-day interval between 5-day blocks of self-administration, and 3 days/week for 3 weeks, with a 4-day interval between 3-day blocks of self-administration. Daytime activity and activity-based sleep measures were evaluated with Actiwatch monitors a week before (baseline parameters) and throughout each protocol. Methamphetamine self-administration markedly disrupted sleep-like measures and increased daytime activity. Tolerance developed to those effects with repeated methamphetamine intake exceeding five consecutive days. Inclusion of washout periods (2 or 4 days) between blocks of methamphetamine self-administration attenuated the development of tolerance, with longer breaks from methamphetamine intake being more effective in maintaining the sleep-disrupting and stimulant effects of methamphetamine. Tolerance can develop to the stimulant and sleep-disrupting effects of methamphetamine self-administration. Interruption of drug intake extends the effects of methamphetamine on sleep-like measures and daytime activity.
Keywords Methamphetamine
Sleep
Self-administration
Activity
Actigraphy
Rhesus monkeys
Language English
Sponsor USPHS
AFIP
FAPESP
Grant number USPHS: DA10344
USPHS: DA031246
USPHS: ODP51OD11132
FAPESP: 2015/25482-3
Date 2017
Published in Psychopharmacology. New York, v. 234, n. 15, p. 2277-2287, 2017.
ISSN 0033-3158 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Springer
Extent 2277-2287
Origin http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-017-4654-1
Access rights Open access Open Access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000406177900005
URI http://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/51485

Show full item record




File

File Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Search


Browse

Statistics

My Account