Aerobic exercise acutely prevents the endothelial dysfunction induced by mental stress among subjects with metabolic syndrome: the role of shear rate

Aerobic exercise acutely prevents the endothelial dysfunction induced by mental stress among subjects with metabolic syndrome: the role of shear rate

Author Sales, Allan R. K. Google Scholar
Fernandes, Igor A. Google Scholar
Rocha, Natalia G. Google Scholar
Costa, Lucas S. Google Scholar
Rocha, Helena N. M. Google Scholar
Mattos, Joao D. M. Google Scholar
Vianna, Lauro C. Google Scholar
Silva, Bruno M. Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Nobrega, Antonio C. L. Google Scholar
Institution Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF)
Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Abstract Mental stress induces transient endothelial dysfunction, which is an important finding for subjects at cardiometabolic risk. Thus, we tested whether aerobic exercise prevents this dysfunction among subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and whether an increase in shear rate during exercise plays a role in this phenomenon. Subjects with MetS participated in two protocols. in protocol 1 (n = 16), endothelial function was assessed using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Subjects then underwent a mental stress test followed by either 40 min of leg cycling or rest across two randomized sessions. FMD was assessed again at 30 and 60 min after exercise or rest, with a second mental stress test in between. Mental stress reduced FMD at 30 and 60 min after the rest session (baseline: 7.7 +/- 0.4%, 30 min: 5.4 +/- 0.5%, and 60 min: 3.9 +/- 0.5%, P < 0.05 vs. baseline), whereas exercise prevented this reduction (baseline: 7.5 +/- 0.4%, 30 min: 7.2 +/- 0.7%, and 60 min: 8.7 +/- 0.8%, P > 0.05 vs. baseline). Protocol 2 (n = 5) was similar to protocol 1 except that the first period of mental stress was followed by either exercise in which the brachial artery shear rate was attenuated via forearm cuff inflation or exercise without a cuff. Noncuffed exercise prevented the reduction in FMD (baseline: 7.5 +/- 0.7%, 30 min: 7.0 +/- 0.7%, and 60 min: 8.7 +/- 0.8%, P > 0.05 vs. baseline), whereas cuffed exercise failed to prevent this reduction (baseline: 7.5 +/- 0.6%, 30 min: 5.4 +/- 0.8%, and 60 min: 4.1 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.05 vs. baseline). in conclusion, exercise prevented mental stress-induced endothelial dysfunction among subjects with MetS, and an increase in shear rate during exercise mediated this effect.
Keywords flow-mediated dilation
shear rate
mental stress test
aerobic exercise
Language English
Sponsor Brazilian National Council of Scientific and Technological Development
Foundation of Research Support of Rio de Janeiro State
Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel
Brazilian Funding Agency for Studies and Projects
Date 2014-04-01
Published in American Journal of Physiology-heart and Circulatory Physiology. Bethesda: Amer Physiological Soc, v. 306, n. 7, p. H963-H971, 2014.
ISSN 0363-6135 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Amer Physiological Soc
Extent H963-H971
Origin http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.00811.2013
Access rights Open access Open Access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000334077400004
URI http://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/37580

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